The Tax Free First Home Savings Account (TFFHSA) Explained

The Tax Free First Home Savings Account (TFFHSA) Explained

There is a new tax advantaged account in Canada, the Tax Free First Home Savings Account! Along with the TFSA and RRSP, the new Tax Free First Home Savings Account (TFFHSA) is another great way to reach your financial goals in a very tax efficient way. The account provides a significant advantage to those planning to purchase their first home and creates a new option for parents who are thinking about helping their children with a future home purchase.

The new Tax Free First Home Savings Account (TFFHSA) does add a little bit of complexity to an already complex landscape of tax planning options, however like the TFSA and RRSP, if used properly it can help accelerate progress towards financial goals like purchasing a home and planning for retirement.

When saving and investing for future goals you can now choose between TFSA, RRSP, and the new TFFHSA, and for families with small children, there is the RESP too.

The new Tax Free First Home Savings Account is very new, so in this post we’re going to explore how this account works, the eligibility criteria, the contribution and withdrawal rules, some things to possibly watch out for, and some strategic options when using it within your financial plan.

How Much Money Does Life Insurance Cost?

How Much Money Does Life Insurance Cost?

Life insurance is important, but how much life insurance should you purchase? How much money does life insurance cost? And how can you fit the monthly premiums into your current budget?

These are important questions. Life insurance is an important tool, and it can be relatively inexpensive, but the cost of life insurance can quickly change depending on certain factors.

Life insurance is important when you have people who are dependent on your income. Young families in particular have a high need for life insurance, but at the same time, young families also have a lot of demands on their cash flow.

Purchasing affordable life insurance is an important part of a financial plan and the cost of life insurance needs to fit into monthly spending without causing a lot of stress.

In this post we’ll explore some life insurance costs for a family in their 30’s with a young child. We’ll see how life insurance costs can vary depending on certain factors. We’ll also see how much life insurance costs in a real life situation.

If You Had To Purchase Your Home Again Today, Could You Afford It?

If You Had To Purchase Your Home Again Today, Could You Afford It?

One disconcerting phenomenon we’ve noticed recently is that many people, if they had to purchase their home again today, likely couldn’t afford it.

With changes to down payment rules and mortgage qualification, plus the recent increase in home prices, the “numbers” needed to qualify for a home purchase are higher than ever.

The fact is that many people, if they were to purchase again today, would be priced out of their own homes!

There are a few reasons for this, which we’ll explore below, but based on affordability today, many of us might not be able to afford the home we live in today if we had to purchase it again.

We will also share three examples below of people who purchased their home in the past but likely couldn’t afford the same home today if they had to purchase again.

Four Financial Risks Worth Taking

Four Financial Risks Worth Taking

Sometimes you have to take a risk. But not all risks are created equal. Some risks have rewards that greatly outweigh the potential downside. These risks can pay off big-time down the road, but its important to pick the right ones.

When it comes to personal finance there are lots of risks (and lots of rewards!). Taking a few strategic risks can do wonders for your long-term personal finances. But it’s important to understand the trade-offs.

Almost nothing in the world of personal finance is completely risk free (except maybe a guaranteed deposit with an insured bank) but there are four financial risks that can be worth taking.

If you understand the potential downsides, these financial risks can have a huge positive impact on your finances.

The Benefit Of Financial Planning When You’re Young

The Benefit Of Financial Planning When You’re Young

There’s a common misconception that financial planning isn’t necessary when you’re young. Young people are often told to go “read some books” about personal finance. Financial planning is traditionally thought of as something reserved for those with higher income, higher net worth, transitioning into retirement etc.

The fact is… this couldn’t be further from the truth.

One of the BEST times to build a financial plan is when you’re young, when you have lots of options, when you’re designing your life (both personally and financially), and when you’re making some BIG financial decisions that will impact you well into the future.

Some of the financial decisions you make while you’re young can haunt you for years or decades. Making the right decisions now can mean less stress and greater peace of mind in the future.

So why is there this misconception that financial planning isn’t for young people?

Most likely because financial planning in the past was focused on products, it was all about investments, insurance, new debt etc. Products that could be sold. Young people were often left out of the conversation because in general, young people don’t need products, they need advice.

Getting the right advice is so important when you’re young.

Even small decisions can have an enormous impact over time. It’s important to get the right advice early on, avoid common mistakes, and create the right systems and habits that will pay dividends for decades to come.

This advice should cover a few key areas that “traditional” financial advisors rarely cover.

Living At Home To Save Money. Should Parents Invite Children Back Home After Graduation?

Living At Home To Save Money. Should Parents Invite Children Back Home After Graduation?

It’s a challenging time for new graduates. The employment environment is difficult in many sectors/industries, plus the cost of rent and housing have outpaced inflation for years and years. It can feel very daunting to leave post-secondary when faced with mediocre job prospects and sky-high housing costs.

In some situations, the “bank of mom and dad” will step in and provide support. But, for the majority of families, that isn’t an option.

So how can parents help provide new grads a “leg up” in this challenging time?

More and more parents are inviting their adult children back home for 1-2 years after graduating to help them save money and pay off debt.

It may not be a cash gift, but it can provide nearly the same advantage.

Living at home to save money is a strategy that is on the rise. Parents are encouraging their children to take advantage of this opportunity and more and more adult children are doing it.

Living at home after graduation creates the opportunity to save $20,000, $30,000 or $40,000+ in one year, an opportunity that may never happen again.

Living at home for 1-2 years provides a huge head start for a new grad. This head start can be used to pay down student debt, build an emergency fund, start investing, buy a house etc. etc.

But it’s not all positive though. Living at home for a couple years also has risks. Without having a strategy in place it’s very easy to succumb to pitfalls like lifestyle inflation etc.

Here’s why parents should encourage their adult children to live at home for a couple years after graduation, and why new grads should seriously consider taking advantage.

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