RRSP Deadline: Should You Make An RRSP Contribution This Year?

RRSP Deadline: Should You Make An RRSP Contribution This Year?

The RRSP deadline is quickly approaching on March 1st, and you should get ready for advertisements selling you all sorts of RRSP products over the next few weeks. But despite what the advertisements suggest, should you actually make an RRSP contribution this year? Maybe, but maybe not.

In this blog post we’re going to highlight 5 reasons why you SHOULD NOT make an RRSP contribution this year.

As we build financial plans with clients, we sometimes come across situations where RRSP contributions were made to the detriment of the client. The client was in one or more of the situations below, but they were still advised to make RRSP contributions, or they were advised to split contributions between RRSP and TFSA, or sometimes they were not given any tax planning or government benefit advice at all.

Depending on the situation, this has cost a number of clients $10,000’s in extra income tax or reduced government benefits.

So, as the RRSP deadline approaches, watch out for these five situations where RRSP contributions may not be the best option, and always seek the advice of an unbiased advice-only financial planner to create a thorough income tax and government benefit strategy before making $1,000’s in RRSP contributions.

What Is Financial Independence Retire Early aka FIRE?

What Is Financial Independence Retire Early aka FIRE?

You may have noticed a new term starting to creep into the mainstream financial media, that term is FIRE, and you might be wondering, “What the heck is FIRE? And how is it related to personal finances?”.

FIRE is an acronym that stands for Financial Independence/Retire Early. The basic idea is that if you pursue FIRE you can eventually stop working for money. You can be financially independent. You can do anything, retire early, keep working, volunteer, basically you can have more freedom.

The idea is that with enough savings/investments you’ll eventually reach the point where you can live off your investment income indefinitely. Once you reach this point you’re considered financially independent, you no longer NEED to work for an income, and can retire to a life of leisure (although you may choose to continue to work, change roles/professions, start a business, or volunteer).

While the concept of early retirement sounds amazing, it does take quite a bit of focus and determination to get there. To reach FIRE it requires a high savings rate, very high.

The typical financial advice given to the public is to save and investment approximately 20% of your net income (part of the simple 50/30/20 budget).

But to reach financial independence retire early you need to save more, much more. To reach FIRE you need to have a savings rate somewhere in the 30%-70%+ range. The higher your savings rate the faster you can stop working for money.

Because it’s easier to reach financial independence/retire early with a high savings rate, the path to FIRE is made easier with an above average income. With an above average income, basic expenses are easily covered, and it becomes more about managing lifestyle inflation. People who pursue FIRE try to limit their lifestyle inflation to maintain a high savings rate.

FIRE is also possible with a below average income, but requires a lot of creativity to reduce basic expenses. This may include house hacking, avoiding car ownership, and more extreme lifestyles. To reach financial independence/retire early with a low-income you need to live an alternative lifestyle.

Reaching FIRE is one of those extreme personal finance goals, it’s a goal that isn’t for everyone.

Even though the end goal sounds appealing, it requires a lot of hard work and dedication along the way. Reaching financial independence retire early means living way below your means for the rest of your life. It’s a lifestyle more than it is an end goal. It’s a lifestyle with a lot of freedom, but it’s also a lifestyle that requires a lot of control.

If you’re able to control your spending, and save a large % of your income, then reaching financial independence might only be a few years away.

To find out how far away you are from financial independence you can make a copy of our FIRE calculator and quickly calculate how many years it will take to reach FIRE in your situation. It will help you estimate how many years from FIRE you are based on your net-income, current expenses, and existing savings.

We’ve used our FIRE calculator to create four examples of how to reach FIRE.

Three Ways To Visualize Your Financial Goals

Three Ways To Visualize Your Financial Goals

Goals are a fantastic way to motivate yourself. Having a big, ambitious goal will help you prioritize other things in your life. It gives you something to work toward. Something that you care deeply about. It helps you balance what you need today with what you want to achieve in the future.

Financial goals have made a huge difference in my life. Setting powerful financial goals has helped me focus on the things that matter to me and ignore the things that don’t. They’ve helped me prioritize my spending to better align with my short and long-term goals.

Because of these financial goals, I’ve cut $1,000’s per year in wasteful spending. Spending that really didn’t provide much value to me. Spending that was mostly driven out of habit. Spending that I’d gladly cut in favor of my long-term goals.

Once you have a financial goal then you have to track it. And this can be a challenge on its own.

One thing that helps me reach my financial goals (or any goal for that matter) is to track my progress visually.

Maybe I’m a visual person but I find it helps me to “see” where I’ve come from and where I’m going. It’s super motivating to see that I’m hitting my monthly goals and that I’m on track to hit my long-term goal.

There are a few different ways to visualize your goals. I’m going to share my three favorite visualization techniques with you.

Best Time To Plan For Retirement? Age 70? 65? 60? 55? 50? 45?

Best Time To Plan For Retirement? Age 70? 65? 60? 55? 50? 45?

There is never a bad time to start saving for retirement, but when is the BEST time to start planning? We’ve been told to start saving & investing for retirement from a very young age, the earlier the better, but when do you actually start planning for retirement itself? When do you start to think about income, expenses, taxes and government benefits during your retirement years?

Retirement can be very complex. When you reach retirement it’s pretty easy to have 6-10 different income sources, all with different tax treatments and claw back rules. One income source can be tax free while the other is fully taxed. Some retirement income is counted when calculating government benefit claw backs while others aren’t. These rules can make it difficult to estimate how much you can expect in retirement.

Retirees usually have their own source of retirement income from TFSAs, RRSPs, LIRAs, RRIFs, and non-registered accounts. Plus, they have government retirement programs like CPP, OAS and GIS. Then there are government benefits like the GST/HST credit and other senior’s benefits. And on top of that there are defined benefit pensions and annuities too.

With all these different income sources, it can get a little confusing. It can be difficult to know exactly how much can you expect in retirement income, how much will be lost to taxes, and how that matches up with retirement expenses.

As you get closer to retirement it can be extremely helpful to have a retirement plan in place. A plan that integrates all these different sources of income, calculates taxes and government benefits, and ensures you can reach your retirement spending goals. But can you reach a point where it’s too late to plan for retirement?

When is the best time to plan for retirement?

How Canadian Dividends Can Both Help And Hurt In Retirement

How Canadian Dividends Can Both Help And Hurt In Retirement

In the last post we highlighted how Canadian dividends receive special tax treatment which can lead to very low and even negative tax rates at some income levels. But before you go and shift your portfolio towards Canadian dividends it’s important to understand how Canadian dividends can either help or hurt your situation, especially in retirement.

Canadian dividends are taxed in a particular way which can lead to some unintended consequences, especially when government benefits are involved. While Canadian dividends can lead to lower tax rates, they can also lead to higher benefit clawbacks on GIS and OAS benefits.

If you can avoid these pitfalls then Canadian dividends, when used strategically, can allow you to withdraw from an RRSP and pay no additional tax.

In this blog post we’re going to look at three examples of how Canadian eligible dividends can both help and hurt in retirement.

Safe Vs Max Retirement Spending

Safe Vs Max Retirement Spending

If you’re thinking about retirement, then one big question you probably have is how much you can spend in retirement without running out of money in the future.

You probably want to know how much retirement spending your investment portfolio, CPP, OAS and other retirement income can safely support.

In this blog post we’re going to take a closer look at two important levels of retirement spending, your “safe” level of retirement spending and your “max” level of retirement spending.

These are two very important spending levels that every retirement plan should highlight. Your “safe” and “max” level retirement spending represent both lower and upper guardrails for your retirement plan.

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